Ãëàâíàÿ Àëüáîìû Îòçûâû Èíòåðâüþ Ïðîã-ðîê Êîíòàêòû

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New album

The Ocean Of Unspoken Words

Order started ! www.rockcompany.nl

 

 

 

 

Reviews of critics and the publications

> to Home

Reviews / «The Ocean of Unspoken Words» (2017):

• oneworldmusic.co.uk

• yourmusicblog.nl

• progarchives.com

• iO Pages, ¹144 / mennovonbruckenfock.nl

• Empire Music, ¹121

• giornalemetal.blogspot.com

 

Reviews / «The First Cosmic» (2015):

• cabezademoog.blogspot.ru

• Classic Rock Society, ¹210

• Progression, ¹68

• progarchives.com

• artrock.pl

• backgroundmagazine.nl

• iO Pages, ¹130

• proggies.ch

• yourmusicblog.nl

• musikreviews.de

• progpraat.com

 

Reviews / «Way Of The King» (2013):

• rateyourmusic.com

• progarchives.com

 

Reviews / «Childhood's End?» (2013):

• rateyourmusic.com, progarchives.com

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• One World Music, 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

Apart from coming up with one of the best album titles of all time, Sunrise Auranaut have created an album of progressive bliss for the ever growing throng of this revitalised genre, from each track we can hear cultured arrangements that thrill and carry the listener all along the way.


Remnants of Yes, with a mild smattering of Emerson Lake and Palmer abound here; the percussion lifts the project with an undeniable sense of power and posture, In A Room With Many Mirrors a fine example of this bands cleverness.


I grew up with a cousin that played Wakeman and King Arthur relentlessly and some of that you can find here. Listen though to the subtleties of tracks like The Last Meeting, one could easily be mistaken that perhaps Keith Emerson had reincarnated back into our time frame, you can’t keep a good rocker down!


Sunrise Auranaut have created something a little special here, just listen to The Great Dumb (Cinema) and be amazed at the flexibility of tone, tempo and composition of arrangement. Take in the outstanding Late Night Is Early Morning (After the Holiday) and understand that within this album, a new era of progressive rock has been born, the era of Sunrise Auranaut. This is one album that has to be brought, has to be listened, this is a work that raises the bar in this genre by a mile.

 

ÂâåðõSource

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• yourmusicblog.nl, 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

Oh my! In my review of the previous album from Vitaly Kiselev’s Sunrise Auranaut I suggested he’d try a more focused approach to his music to attract even more listeners. And while I am not sure it is because of that remark, the thing that is sure is that this album surpasses it’s predecessor on every level.


Let’s start with the artwork, I think this is simply stunning! Next the songs of course. On offer are 9 songs and this time Kiselev (electric and acoustic guitars, bass and programming) got help in from Alexander Malakhov on synths. Total playing time is just over 50 minutes and the songs range from around 4 to over 8 minutes. And like before, this is an all instrumental album with it’s feet firmly rooted in Seventies progressive rock, spiced with the influence of classical composers like Tchaikovsky and Grieg.
But the most important thing for me is the balance in this collection. All songs have room to breathe so the melodies really shine. Since it is a prime example of what is looked upon as the classic era of prog, it is never heavy or flashy. This is all about telling stories with the songs and have the melodies to keep you interested. And that is delivered in spades.


As is the case with all releases on the Rock Company label; limited edition digi, so better grab a copy fast! Excellent stuff.

 

Source Ââåðõ
 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• progarchives.com, 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

After a humble beginning with his `Childhood's End' debut back in 2013, Russian multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev has been rapidly honing his skills and releasing consistently more complex and lavish symphonic progressive works, with 2016's `The Ocean of Unspoken Words' his most extravagant work yet. It's a well titled set, seeing as how this fully instrumental disc must rely on no vocals whatsoever to carry the keyboard and guitar-heavy vastness on offer, and `Ocean...' takes the most grandiose and bombastic of elements from the music of Rick Wakeman, the Flower Kings, Genesis, Camel, the Par Lindh Project and Karfagen amongst others, delivering a set that symphonic-prog lovers will adore.
Looking at some of the highlights, the piano pomp, chunky bass and ravishing synth runs (Vitaly handing the reins over this time around to keyboardist Alexander Malakhov) of `Perseids' sounds like Rick Wakeman jamming with Renaissance's Jon Camp and John Tout, a strong opener of fancy themes and classical elegance in amongst the whirring electronics. Both `In A Room With Many Mirrors', with its frantic keyboard runs and pounding drumming, and `The Last Meeting's ghostly organ and gothic swoon remind of Japanese all-female trio Ars Nova, and `Who Is There?' is slightly loopy with a quirky Flower Kings-like colour behind some tougher electric guitar bite and keyboard majesty along the lines of the Par Lindh Project.

The title track `The Ocean Of Unspoken Words' is one of the more ambitious pieces of the disc, full of grand orchestration-like synths and dreamy shimmering guitars delivering stirring reprising themes. The first half of `Free Wind And Home Draft' is strident and infectious before floating into mysterious spectral ambience, the reaching electric guitar strains with a touch of blues over superior organ throughout `The Secrets Of Nightlife' could have appeared on the early Steve Hackett solo albums, and the organ-dominated `The Great Dumb (Cinema)' has plenty of brisk and playful up-tempo dashes (and just listen to that tasty spacey gliding synth passage at about the 1:22 mark!). `Late Night Is Early Morning (After The Holiday)' perhaps comes the closest to a Camel-like moment, a more compact rocker that shows off plenty of Vitaly's wondrous guitar variety, ultimately revealing itself to be a frequently joyful and uplifting closer full of hope, and possibly the highlight of the album.

While some sections sound fairly similar to each-other and the music could do with more subtlety and less constant busyness, `The Ocean of Unspoken Words' is complete evidence of a talented artist growing in confidence, maturity and sophistication, delivering an immense work that comes close to being the equal of many of the higher-status acts currently performing in a symphonic style. This is story-telling prog as richly possible without utilising lyrics or vocals, and for fans of any of the above mentioned artists and progressive music proudly in the Seventies Prog tradition, this disc comes highly recommended and is composer Vitaly Kiselev's finest achievement to date.

Four stars.

(Note - Vitaly, if you read this - please don't be discouraged by the instant one-star low votes from a bunch of petty, bitter and inferior music rivals on here. Be confident and proud of your music, continue to compose your superb instrumental works and don't let anyone convince you otherwise of your great worth as an artist)

Source

Ââåðõ
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• iO Pages, ¹144 / mennovonbruckenfock.nl, 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

Russian Vitaly Kiselev presents his fourth studio album of largely his own making, including cover design and production. The musician spent close to 2 years on it, and plays keyboards, guitar and bass, programmed the drums and produced the album. He did get help from Alexander Malakhov, who played all the synthesizer parts. The nine compositions are inspired by the prog of the Seventies and by classical influences from well known composers like Tchaikovsky and Grieg. One can hear that he recorded this in his home studio, it does not irritate, but high quality it certainly is not, with especially the drums sounding awfully thin. The instrumental music is nice though and revokes memories of Emerson Lake and Palmer. A track like Late Night Is Early Morning reminds me of Camel. Some parts, mainly because of the drum sound, remind me of Under Wraps from Jethro Tull. Of course Kiselev's colleagues like Maxxess and Helmut Teubner could also function as references. Free Wind And Home Draft holds a choral piece. The sound of the guitar is almost always medium heavy and distorted. Influences from classical music and frequent tempo changes are characteristics that fit prog, but with this Seventies tinged style I miss real drums and analogue synths.
Nevertheless a pleasant album that moves along nicely.

 

Source Ââåðõ
 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• Empire Music, ¹121 (DE), 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

Es gibt sie noch, die „Ein Mann und sein Keyboard“-Alben. Nun, so ganz stimmt das in diesem Fall nicht, denn Vitaly Kiselev, der hinter dem Projekt Sunrise Auranaut steht, ist sicherlich in erster Linie Keyboarder, aber er spielt auf The Ocean Of Unspoken Words auch E- und akustische Gitarre sowie Bass. Überhaupt hater so ziemlich alles im Alleingang gemacht: die Musik komponiert, eingespielt, produziert und dann auch noch das Coverdesign entworfen. Man hört, dass Kiselev anscheinend eine klassische Musikausbildung genossen hat, denn der orchestrale Charakter des Instrumentalalbums erinnert an die Musik von Grieg und Tschaikowski. Es wird nur wenig verwundern, dass der russische Musiker Bands wie unter anderem ELP und Genesis zu seinen Einflüssen zählt.

Die Musik fließt sehr dynamisch, stellenweise mitreißend und rockig aus den Boxen. The Ocean Of Unspoken Words ist sehr professionell gemacht, aber man hört ihm schon an, dass es alleine, im eigenen Homestudio entwickelt wurde, dadurch wirkt es manchmal etwas steril. Wer jedoch einen Mix aus Klassik und Keyboard-dominiertem Instrumental-Prog schätzt, sollte durchaus mal ein Ohr riskieren.

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••Ââåðõ

 

• Giornale Metal (IT), 2017.

• review of the album «The Ocean of Unspoken Words».

 

Scrivere di questa particolare band non è molto semplice. I russi Sunrise Auranaut nascono come studio project dal polistrumentista Vitaly Kiselev. Quest’ultimo ha dato vita a questo particolare e interessante per certi versi progetto musicale. L’album in questione sicuramente non è di facile ascolto per chi cerca veloci e immediate melodie da assimilare all’istante, oppure chi è in cerca di forza bruta e grezza. Qui si parla di una particolare miscela di suoni e generi che spaziano dal rock, metal, symphonic al progressive di classe. Le influenze che se ne ricavano da The Ocean Of Unspoken Words sono molteplici. Si possono trovare reminiscenze di Uriah Heep, Yes, E.L.P. , ma Kiselev non disdegna neanche il prog di stampo prettamente italiano, quello tanto per capirci degli anni ’70. Si, perché il compositore russo sembra amare particolarmente il nostro orgoglio musicale conosciuto in tutto il mondo.

E come se si mischiano in un unico calderone Goblin, PFM, New Trolls e tutto quello che ne consegue. Potrebbe apparire ad un primo ascolto prolisso, ma pian piano cresce la voglia di addentrarsi sempre più in questo particolare mondo fatto anche di molta psichedelica. All’interno di questo lavoro possiamo trovare quindi svariate tipologie di brani tra cui alcuni davvero validi come The Secret Of Nightlife, oppure la più ariosa Who Is There , una delle tracce più riuscite. Mentre con In a Room with Many Mirrors, possiamo facilmente ricordare la grande PFM. In linea di massima anche se non è di facile presa, dopo svariati ascolti l’album riesce comunque a convincere e conquistarsi un posto nella propria collezione di prog album di tutto rispetto. Non sarà per tutti, consigliato a chi si nutre di questo particolare genere che richiede tra l’altro probabilmente più di un ascolto per essere apprezzato appieno.

 

Source Ââåðõ
 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• cabezademoog.blogspot.ru, 2016.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Un disco que nos compartió uno de nuestros tantos amigos, no se dejen guiar por su tapa horrenda, este es un progresivo de calidad, básicamente alegre, emotivo, intenso y melodioso. Proyecto del multi-instrumentista ruso Vitaly Kiselev. Empezamos un viernes con sorpresas en una semana llena de sorpresas, bueno, como siempre, ya va siendo habitual.

El disco tienen muchísima musicalidad, frescura, agilidad, dinamismo, alegría, siendo su único punto flojo la producción, se nota en la tapa pero sobretodo referido a los niveles altísimos, exageradamente altos de ganancia, ello disminuye mucho la calidad final que carece de rango dinámico, pero les aseguro que el disco está realmente entretenido.
Esta música, cercana al space rock, con algo de Mike Oldfield o Eloy, es realmente original y es todo un viaje que te lleva en un recorrido de la mente hacia universos inexplorados e ingenuos de pompas de jabón, como tan mal se lo trata de definir en el portada del disco. Así que pueden sentarse en un momento de tranquilidad, a final del dia, a disfrutar por los múltiples viajes que proponen los sonidos de Vitaly Kiselev. Y déjense llevar que realmente la van a pasar de maravillas.
El multi-instrumentista ruso Vitaly Kiselev te lleva de la mano, en éste que es su tercer álbum, en un viaje a través del espacio o del tiempo, conformado por una mezcla instrumental del space rock de los años 70s y elementos más actuales.
Los temas son instrumentales, soñadores, el disco está hecho con las mejores intenciones y Kiselev estará sin duda muy orgulloso con su música y su disco, realizado de manera muy casera y con varios defectos en su producción pero que no deja de ser una fuente de ideas. Escuchen la música del video y vean si les gusta, porque pueden pasar muy gratos momentos con éste disco.
 

Ââåðõ

Source

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• Classic Rock Society, ¹210 (UK), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

It's always a joy to come across someone in progressive rock who is young and bursting with both talent and enthusiasm: it bodes well for the future of the genre; and Russian multi-instrumentalist and composer Vitaly Kiselev is a prime example. He already has two accomplished and well-received instrumental albums to his credit: his debut Childhood’s End? was released in spring 2013; that autumn, there followed the publication of the concept album Way Of The King. Now comes The First Cosmic, featuring songs written between 2003 and 2006 which centre around Kiselev’s favourite themes in music: space and science fiction. Again, it's an instrumental album, and about the only other thing you really need to know about it is that it contains some of the most melodic prog rock instrumental music produced in recent years. There's not one piece on here that fails to interest, and though the pieces are for the most part relatively short, each feels like an epic, simply because he manages to cram so many changes of feel, tempo and texture into it. The whole album is a delight, and an object lesson to anyone who has ambitions in the genre.

 

Kiselev uses a variety of instrumentation, and never allows one sound to dominate for too long, giving a delightful ow to the album; and while each track sounds great as a stand-alone, the whole 60 minute’s worth is a very rewarding listening experience from start to nish... but then, I suppose that's exactly what you'd expect from a talented musician/ composer who hails from the land of Tchaikovsky and The Five!

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••Ââåðõ

 

• Progression, ¹68 (US), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

The First Cosmic is the third (all-instrumental) studio album by Russian multi-instrumentalist/composer Vitaly Kiselev, a/k/a Sunrise Auranaut. (A cool project moniker reflecting Vitaly's preoccupation with science fiction/ space themes.) Kiselev performs these 11 celestial excursions primarily via synthesizers, although electric guitar shares an occasional lead and acoustic fretwork brings further variety. Vitaly does a yeoman's job coaxing upbeat melodies from a rich, multilayered symphonic palette. At his best, as on 10-minute opener "Amazing Universe," the results are rapturously Yes-like; ditto for the waltzy singsong vibe of closer "The Wisdom of Mother Earth." Elsewhere, The First Cosmic is a hit or miss proposition in terms of cogent melodic themes needed to give his ambitious orchestrations form and function. Consequently, the likes of "The Threshold," "We Will Meet at the Spaceport," "Nonstop," etc. mosey along as energetically well-played yet compositionally unfocused arrangement-sketches seeking ideas to grab ahold of. As skilled as Kiselev is as a player, the thin ersatz splash of programmed drums does his otherwise sumptuous sound no favors. Perhaps Sunrise Auranaut's next cosmic port of call should be a full-band format.

 

 

Ââåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• progarchives.com, 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Two years ago, Russian multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev, under the alias Sunrise Auranaut, released his second album 'Way of the King', a humble little do-it-yourself instrumental symphonic prog work with cheerful cover artwork that showed an emerging artist growing in confidence and finding his feet. 2015 has the artist stepping up for his third album 'The First Cosmic', an hour long journey overloaded with enough endless ideas and great playing to fill numerous albums! This is proudly symphonic-styled prog in the regal manner of modern groups like Karfagen, Trion or Willowglass, with 'Snow Goose'-era Camel, perhaps Rick Wakeman's solo works, Emerson, Lake and Palmer and a hint of Jethro Tull thrown in for good measure, but also given a frequently spacey spin! Deep space keyboard atmospheres and pastoral acoustics make for an interesting mix in this vibrant album, and it's Vitaly's strongest work to date.


Just pay attention to the 10 minute opener 'Amazing Universe' - it sets an early template with so many glorious memorable themes and includes everything from cascading church organ, whirring Moog, marching drum pomp, murky electric guitar grunt, harpsichord-like glistenings and flighty acoustic guitar runs, the piece effortlessly gliding between the multiple instruments and passages with a great sense of flow and purpose. The heroic, infectious 'Incarnation Calls' and joyfully groovy 'Non-Stop' are delirious and up-tempo, 'Atmosphere and Vacuum' floats with a gentle hint of eeriness and dangerous outbursts, and the balance of acoustic guitar loveliness and romantic keyboards of 'Pristine Planet' bring favourable memories of Camel. 'We Will Meet at the Spaceport' mixes in the drifting deep space of Sensations' Fix with organ-driven classic era Genesis majesty, subtle electronic loops and cinematic-flavoured synth flair rises victoriously in 'Threshold', and the drowsy acoustic strums and reaching Floydian guitar strains over icy synths of 'Lost in Deep Space' remind of Seventies group Pulsar in a few spots.

An hour that contains eleven tracks is definitely too much here (perhaps the old LP length of about 45-50 minutes would be more ideal?), and Vitaly shouldn't always feel the need to overload each piece with multiple direction and style changes, but there's no denying the constant inspiration and growing confidence on display. It truly sees the artist edging closer to the quality of modern symphonic progressive albums like Trion's 'Funfair Fantasy', Willowglass' 'The Dream Harbour' and Karfagen's 'Lost Symphony', not to mention the earlier works of Glass Hammer, and perhaps were it to have been released by one of those more established names it would already be receiving more positive attention. But in a year that hasn't had an abundance of symphonic releases, the well-executed and energetic 'The First Cosmic' is definitely one of the highlights, and Vitaly Kiselev should be very proud of what he has achieved here.

Four stars - Symphonic fans and keyboard freaks, be sure to look into this colourful album!

 

Source Ââåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• artrock.pl (PL), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Ocena: 7 (10) Dobry, zasługujący na uwagę album.

Zaniosłem to wszystko do pokoju i tak trochę na chybił, a bardziej na trafił wyciągnąłem płytkę z mydlanymi bańkami na okładce. Sunrise Auranaut – nazwa zupełnie mi nieznana. Krótki rzut oka na rewers okładki – jednoosobowy projekt rosyjskiego muzyka Witalija Kisielewa. Nazwisko też mi nic nie mówi.

Dźwięki które popłynęły chwilę później z głośników dość jednoznacznie umiejscowiły Sunrise Auranaut na progowej mapie świata – wszędzie dobrze, ale najfajniej było w latach siedemdziesiątych. Też się przychylam do takiego poglądu, dlatego od razu poczułem sporą sympatię do muzyki z „The First Cosmic”.

Jest to płyta rozkosznie staroświecka – od muzyki, przez aranżacje, instrumentarium, aż po traktowanie słuchaczy jako tego najważniejszego ogniwa łańcucha, jako tych dla których się muzykę robi. To ostatnie teoretycznie powinno być to oczywistością, ale mam wrażenie, że dla bardzo wielu współczesnych prog-manów najważniejsze jest dopieszczanie własnego ego, a nie zadowolenie słuchaczy.

Wydaje mi się, że Kisielewowi nie starczyło muzyki na całą godzinę, czasami troszkę smędzi. Chociaż z drugiej strony, słuchając tych utworów pojedynczo trudno znaleźć coś ewidentnie słabszego. Może za dużo podobnych do siebie grzybków w tym barszczu? Chociaż „The Wisdom of Mother Earth” strasznie zalatuje dancingiem. Wypadałoby wspomnieć o produkcji, ale jej nie ma. Nagrano po prostu instrumenty, jeden, drugi, trzeci i tak dalej, i właściwie to tyle. Dlatego brzmi to biednie. Bardziej delikatnie można by było powiedzieć – ascetycznie. Jednak sama muzyka jest na tyle ciekawa, że da się te sprawy techniczne jakoś pominąć. „The Threshold”, „Amazing Universe”, „Gravity”, „Lost in The Deep Space”, albo gitarowa ballada „Atmosphere And Vacuum” są to utwory na pewno interesujące, ciekawie pomyślane, z niebanalnymi melodiami. Wokali tu nie uświadczymy, bo całość jest instrumentalna. Chyba na progarchivach padały porównania do Pink Floyd, Yes, czy Camel, ale do tego krążka specjalnie mi to nie pasuje – może Pink Floyd to tak, ale najwyżej do „Meddle”, do tego trochę psychodelii, może trochę Eloy, może trochę krauta.

Mimo pewnych niedomagań, szczególnie technicznych, ale i po części muzycznych, moim zdaniem „The First Cosmic” to fajna płyta. Tak w sam raz na siedem gwiazdek.

 

Source Ââåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• backgroundmagazine.nl, 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Sunrise Auranaut is a studio project by Russian multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev. Kiselev doesn't only write the music, but he also recorded, mixed and produced the album. He also made the artwork for the albums, so you can better call him a multi-talent and not just a multi-instrumentalist!

The First Cosmic is Kiselev's third studio album. The album is completely instrumental. The music really reminds me of 70s prog and space rock, like Mike Oldfield and Eloy. Some keyboard parts remind me of Emerson, Lake and Palmer as well.
I will cut straight to the point; I have mixed feelings about the album. I had no idea that the bass and drums are digital recordings, which is a big plus. If you listen more carefully you can hear that the bass and drums are 'not real'. Sadly the bass and drums don't have much variation in sound during the whole album, while the guitars and keyboards do. The guitar sounds he uses remind me of the guitar sounds Mike Oldfield uses on his earlier albums. The music is lovely but sometimes loses my attention and I have the feeling that Kiselev has more to offer. The mix and production are good but could have been better. He wants to accomplish it all on his own but he cannot quite live up to it during some moments in the music. I don't mean it in a bad way, but what would it sound like if he had (guest) musicians, playing the bass guitar and drums, and someone who did (or help with) the recording/mixing/producing? The album begins very promising with the track Amazing Universe. It starts with distorted guitar and a haunting classic organ sound, and later it turns out to be a good track that has the early 70's prog feel. The second track, Incarnation Calls, is a nice up tempo track. Lost In Deep Space brings back the mellowness during the album, while The Cycles Of Desires is pretty rough again. We Will Meet At The Spaceport is quite trippy but cool. Pristine Planet is a nice track starting with an acoustic guitar and later makes you float around the stars and planets. Nonstop is actually a pretty groovy track, becomes more rock-ish halfway and then becomes groovy again. The track Gravity has a very cool intro with a rocking guitar sound, but later it turns into a softer track, while I actually hoped that the rocking guitar would stay during the whole song. The track Atmosphere And Vacuum is a good track, and has a nice haunting surprise halfway. Some weird haunting industrial machine-like sound breaks up the song and then it becomes another track. At the end of the song there's another weird noise again and the track ends with the same music the song starts with. The track The Threshold is very spacy. The last track, The Wisdom Of Mother Earth, is my favourite track of the album. The Mike Oldfield guitar sound is so lovely and the organs quite catchy. This is also a track that shows he is capable of doing more than what most of the album has offered.

The album is just over an hour long, and it's a bit too long for me. I don't say it's a bad album, absolutely not, but I really have the feeling that it can be much more than it is now. I'm actually looking forward when Kiselev would release a new album. And I have to say “Keep up the good work, multi-talent Vitaly! I take my hat off to you sir!”

 

SourceÂâåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• iO Pages, ¹130 (NL), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Achter de intrigerende naam Sunrise Auranaut gaat de Russische multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev schuil. Hij heeft een voorliefde voor prog-rock uit de jaren zeventig en voor science fiction. Die elementen zijn beide goed terug te horen op The
First Cosmic, zijn derde album. De muziek is voornamelijk gitaar richt en op die instrumenten blijkt Kiselev bekwaam te zijn. Synthesizers worden voornamelijk gebruikt ter inkleuring van de muziek met hier en daar een solo. De drums zijn digitaal, maar in tegenstelling tot veel van zijn vakbroeders klinken de snare drums gelukkig redelijk goed. De cd begint aangenaam met Amazing Universe, een afwisselend stuk instrumentale prog met fraaie melodieén en een wat melancholieke sfeer. Het doet me denken aan de muziek van Fonya en in de verte aan die van Mike Oldfield, maar al vanaf het tweede nummer Incarnation Calls komt naar mijn mening de sleet er een beetje in. Dat wil zeggen dat het boeiende van Amazing Universe hier ver te zoeken is. Ook is Kiselev kennelijk nogal een liefhebber van een bepaald gitaareffect, zoals Bread dat in de vroege jaren zeventig gebruikte in de hit If. Helaas weet hij zich in de volgende nummers niet meer te revancheren. Dat is jammer, want potentie heeft deze Rus wel.

 

 

 

Ââåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• proggies.ch (DE), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Hinter Sunrise Auranaut verbirgt sich der Russe Vitaly Kiselev, der dieses Album im völligen Alleingang eingespielt hat. Basierend auf Themen, die er bereits vor 10 Jahren geschrieben hatte und inspiriert von Science Fiction Filmen und dem Weltraum im Allgemeinen, griff er diese Ideen wieder auf und fügte einige neue Elemente dazu. Herausgekommen ist ein unterhaltsames Instrumentalalbum, das hingegen vieler Vorurteile meinerseits gegenüber Einzelmusikern überhaupt nicht langweilig klingt. Ich bin echt positiv überrascht, dass es Kiselev schafft, die Spannung mit tollen Sounds und einprägsamen Melodien aber auch ein paar verrückten Einfällen aufrecht zu halten. Kiselev agiert natürlich hauptsächlich als Keyboarder und Gitarrist. Und die Gitarre kommt nicht zu kurz, das kann ich versprechen. Drums und Bass sind auf dem Computer erzeugt, aber irgendwie klingt das trotzdem natürlich. Interessanterweise wird gerade der künstliche Bass nicht selten in den Vordergrund gemischt, was einen ganz speziellen Klangcharakter hinterlässt. Am besten gefällt mir aber die grosse Tastenvielfalt. Kiselev bedient sich einer breiten Palette an Keyboardsounds, vorallem vom Synthesizer und der Orgel. Die Musik erinnert mich immer wieder ein bisschen an Yes, Genesis, aber auch Omega, Hawkwind, Wakeman etc.

Fazit: Ein Album mit toller Instrumentalmusik, die sich zwischen Space-,Psychedelic- und Prog- Rock bewegt. 60 Minuten Schwebezustand garantiert. Einziger Kritikpunkt: Das Album klingt etwas roh, muss aber gleichzeitig wiederum gestehen, dass mir dies gefällt und gerade zu einem einzigartigen Klangcharakter verleiht.

 

SourceÂâåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• yourmusicblog.nl, 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Sunrise Auranaut is in essence Russian musician Vitaly Kiselev, who wrote all the songs, performed all guitars and keyboards and programmed bass and drums. So yes, this is an instrumental album around the space theme. And Kiselev recorded and mixed it in just over a year and made the artwork as well. Busy guy! According to the press sheet this is his third release, although part of the songs were written between 2003 and 2006. He did revise them though.

And now for the music. Well, not having heard anything from him before, I am sure this classifies as prog rock or symphonic rock. For me the trouble with it is that it partly feels like there are just too many ideas wanting to present themselves to the listener. That distracts from the sometimes nice melodies and comes across a bit overwhelming. For me, a more focused approach would result in an album that grabs you more easily.
It is not a bad album by any means (even though especially the drums suffer from a lack of power and sound demo like), but with an outsider whom Kiselev trusts and who brings in some expertise and can help channelling all these ideas, this music might just appeal to more people.

But hey, maybe that is just me and for someone else this might be the find of the year. It is pretty old school, and a lot of fans keep longing for that, so…

 

Source Ââåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• musikreviews.de (DE), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Seine dritte Scheibe konzipiert der russische Einzelkämpfer Vitaly Kiselev einmal mehr als symphonisches Progressive-Rock-Werk im klassischen Sinn. Synthesizer und Gitarren, die nie allzu hart riffen, halten sich die Waage, das Ganze wird in Ermanglung eines Sängers bewusst lyrisch melodisch inszeniert, und der Betriebsblindheit kann sich das Einmannunternehmen auch nicht erwehren.

Andererseits zeichnen sich ähnlich gelagerte Werke gerade durch diese introvertierte, weltfremde Art aus, und in dieser Hinsicht punktet SUNRISE AURANAUT zumindest teilweise auch … teilweise deshalb, weil der Alleingang in Sachen Klang Eingeständnisse macht, vor allem was das Schlagzeug beziehungsweise dessen Programmierung angeht. Ein echter Drummer hätte hier Wunder gewirkt, aber wie dem auch sei …

Die zahlreichen Passagen ohne vordergründig rhythmische Ausrichtung, die insbesondere die Longtracks "Amazing Universe", "Lost In Deep Space" und "Gravity" auszeichnen, nehmen für Kiselev ein. Der Rundum-Mucker legt ein Verständnis für verschiedene Musikkulturen an den Tag, das "The First Cosmic" einen Ethno-Touch ohne damit normalerweise einhergehende Klischees verleiht. Orientalische Tonfolgen stehen ebenso an der Tagesordnung wie Flüge ins Weltall, ohne dass man Drone-Willkür befürchten müsste.

Trotzdem: Beweist SUNRISE AURANAUT Mut zur Kurzatmigkeit wie mit Incarnation Calls" oder "Pristine Planet", zeigt sich das ganze Geschick von Vitaly als Songwriter. Der Mann kann eingängige wie ungewöhnliche Melodien schreiben und sie motivisch auf einnehmende Weise durcharbeiten, was im Endeffekt das größte Plus dieses nicht überragenden, aber mit für die Zukunft überdurchschnittlich hohem Potenzial ausgestatteten Albums ausmacht. Wie wäre es, eine vollwertige Band um dich zu scharen, Mr. Kontrollfreak?

FAZIT: "The First Cosmic" ist Space Prog vom Typischsten und umgeht die Fallstricke des programmatischen Soloprojektes nicht. Wer mit den kleinen Unzulänglichkeiten und einem Tick Leerlauf innerhalb von Bandwurmkompositionen leben kann, darf sich dieses Kleinod gefahrlos einverleiben.

 

SourceÂâåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

• progpraat.com (NL), 2015.

• review of the album «The First Cosmic».

 

Eens kijken, wat hebben we nou weer aan onze progfiets hangen? Een Rus, zo blijkt. Eentje die een nieuwe plaat heeft gemaakt die via Freia Music is uitgekomen.

 

Sunrise Auranaut is het studioproject van componist en multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev. In de lente 2013 maakte hij zijn debuut met ‘Childhood’s End?’ (hee waar ken ik die titel van?) en in de herfst van datzelfde jaar volgde ‘Way Of The King’, een plaat waarvan hij in 2009 al een demo had gemaakt.

Dat maakt ‘The First Cosmic’ het derde studioalbum. Het idee voor deze plaat ontstond kort na de release van ‘Way Of The King’. Kiselev: “Tussen 2003 en 2006 heb ik veel spacy nummers geschreven, mijn favoriete stijl eigenlijk. Nu heb ik zoveel meer ervaring, instrumenten en apparatuur dan toen dat ik besloot om die nummers te herzien maar nog wel steeds met het space-thema als fundament. Zo kwamen er andere arrangementen, uitvoeringen, geluiden en melodieën en dat resulteerde in dit album waarop ik alle instrumenten zelf bespeel.”

Het album zit vernuftig in elkaar. De nummer sluiten perfect op elkaar aan en bieden een kijkje in de keuken van de componist die inderdaad in staat is om veel muzikale gerechten tot een complete maaltijd om te toveren. Enig punt van kritiek: De gerechten hebben allemaal een basis van dezelfde ingrediënten waardoor het enigzins eentonig wordt als je het vaker eet.

 

SourceÂâåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

Àëüáîì "Way Of The King"• rateyourmusic.com, 2014.

• review of the album «Way Of The King».

 

Derrière le nom de Sunrise Auranaut se cache en fait un multi-instrumentiste russe, Vitaly Kiselev, qui enregistrait tranquillement ses démos en solitaire avant d'être découvert par le label français Musea. Deuxième album édité sur sa division Musea Parallèle, Way of the King présente un rock progressif exclusivement instrumental, très influencé par les seventies. Un concept-album (censé figurer l'histoire d'un roi qui choisit de renoncer au trône pour trouver le bonheur et devient musicien ambulant) globalement symphonique et lumineux à la Yes, à l'impression de douceur accentué par l'omniprésence des synthétiseurs et un son très light. On trouve parfois quelques passages plus énergiques à la ELP pour dynamiser l'ensemble. Un disque sympathique, dans un esprit proche d'un The Coenobite.

 

Source

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

Àëüáîì "Way Of The King"• progarchives.com, 2014.

• review of the album «Way Of The King».

 

`The Way of the King' is a charming instrumental progressive work entirely composed and performed by Vitaly Kiselev, a Russian multi-instrumentalist who goes under the name Sunrise Auranaut. A concept album conveyed purely through musical passages without the use of words, it tells the tale of a king walking away from his life of privilege, status and wealth to become a wandering musician. I'm wondering if the story is a metaphor for Vitaly's own life, either choosing to or wishing to be able to ditch the nine-to-five grind most of us work in for a more artistically satisfying and musically, spiritually fulfilling path?
The tale is told through nine fully instrumental pieces, including a four part title suite, all loaded with vintage keyboard/synth movements, tasteful and heartfelt acoustic guitar with thrilling electric runs and gentle percussion. Full of medieval flavours and madrigal moments, with the occasional regal majesty of Genesis, plenty of the pomp of Rick Wakeman and a touch of the romantic tones of Camel. But while it may sometimes play like a love-letter to it's influences, Vitaly's personal approach always brings a touch of class and sophistication to this smooth and easy-listening journey.

A lovely church organ piece `Prologue/Coronation' opens the album, followed by the wavering Moogs (straight out of the old `Legend of Zelda' games to my ears!) and reflective placid flutes of `Castle Walls...'. Fanfare bluster, urgent electric guitar runs and contemplative acoustic moments feature in the title track, with many romantic and stirring themes worked in throughout. `Young Wind' has an upbeat strolling Hammond melody that will have your foot tapping in no time, while `Minstrel' is a lush symphonic passage with emotional and sweet synth orchestrations galore. Despite a glorious church organ middle, `Who Took - God or the Devil?' brings some unexpected crunching harder rock more reminiscent of Jethro Tull or perhaps even Hawkwind. The prancing melody of `Step By Step' brings to mind the title track of Genesis' `A Trick of the Tail', `Blues of Friendly Heat' (one of my personal favourites) is a dozy jazzy stroll through the woods on playful Hammond, Moog and piano, before `Epilogue: Happy Finale' closes in an epic manner with a reprise of the grand church organ of the beginning.

While the album lacks the dynamics that a full proper group would provide (definitely some live drums would add a lot of warmth and power next time around), there's no denying Vitaly is a talent and very proficient on all the instruments utilised here. Fans of those classic early Rick Wakeman solo works, the first Index album, Karfagen's `Lost Symphony' and maybe even Camel's `The Snow Goose' should give this one a try. I'm a total sucker for these sort of instrumental prog albums, so Vitaly should be very proud of this effort, and I have no doubt we will hear even better works from him in the future. I also feel it's our job to praise and support these sort of little artists who lovingly play progressive music, and besides, anyone who proudly thanks his Mum on the back of the CD booklet is pretty alright with me!

Three and a half stars - great job Vitaly!

 

SourceÂâåðõ

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

Àëüáîì "Way Of The King"Àëüáîì "Childhood's End?"• Progressive Newsletter ¹80 (DE), 2014.

• review of the albums «Childhood's End?» and «Way Of The King».

 

Gleich zwei Alben veröffentlichte der russische Multiinstrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev im vergangenen Jahr, "Way of the king" und eben dieses hier besprochene Album. Beide schlagen in die gleiche Kerbe. Beide sind im wahrsten Wortsinne Soloalben, denn Kiselev spielt hier alles komplett allein ein. Dabei stehen Keyboards und Gitarren gleichberechtigt gegenüber. Es gibt durchaus schöne Momente, aber eine gewisse Hausbackenheit darf man schon unterstellen. Und ziemlich grenzwertig wird es in Sachen Rhythmus, denn der ist programmiert und ist bisweilen dann doch so geartet, dass es tendenziell eher auf die Nerven fallen kann. Wer aber ein Faible für 1-Mann-Projekte hat und derartige Schwächen locker wegstecken kann, mag Sunrise Auranaut mal eine Chance geben.

 

Source

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

Àëüáîì "Childhood's End?"• rateyourmusic.com, progarchives.com, 2013.

• review of the album «Childhood's End?».

 

Sunrise Auranaut is yet another one-man project, this time led by Russian multi-instrumentalist Vitaly Kiselev, who cites Genesis, Yes, E.L.P., Uriah Heep, Eloy and Hawkind as his main influences.Between 2009 and 2012 he produced two demo albums, ''King's way'' and ''Spirit rain'', before being discovered by Musea Records.But while his demos featured a couple of guests on arrangements, Kiselev decided to put an effort of his own on his debut ''Childhood's end?'', dealing with the romance, inner freedom and happiness of any human's early life stages.It was released eventually in early 2013 on Musea Parallele.

While it is rather hard to expect a masterpiece by a single person handling all instruments, the new technology offers so many possibilities, that this effort ended up to be a pleasant and fine listening all the way.Kiselev's influences are evident in a handful of moments in the album, as ''Childhood's end?'' contains plenty of keyboard waves, either in a very flashy and angular way or a more virtuosic, symphonic-oriented mood, albeit performed in a very modern enviroment.Dual and triple synth attacks are all over the place, accompanied by slightly heavy guitars to produce highly energetic and sufficient instrumental pieces with doses of complexity, passionate rhythmic tunes and symphonic interludes.Actually the few organ-based parts recall the music of LE ORME and E.L.P., while another pair of tracks contain mellow acoustic lines along the principles of GENESIS and YES.Other bands that come to mind are IQ or PALLAS in the more synth-drenched offerings, while the album has often a strong spacey/Electronic feeling due to the heavy use of loops and cosmic preludes.More appropriate comparisons would be similar-sounding projects such as NETHERLAND DWARF or BACKYARDS, strongly keyboard-led Progressive Rock, obviously stepping on the traces of old Prog groups but played in a very refreshing way.Most of the compositions are quite great with good guitar riffs, well-played solos and endless, fiery keyboards, split between technique and melody.

Vitaly Kiselev can surely produce some great music, based on his own talent.Although some of the programmed sounds in ''Childhood's end?'' are noone's cup of tea, the overall final feeling is that this is a well-executed and very energetic debut with potential for some better offerings in the near future.Recommended.

 

Source

 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

 

Ââåðõ

> to Home

Ãëàâíàÿ | Àëüáîìû | Îòçûâû | Èíòåðâüþ | Ïðîã-ðîê | Êîíòàêòû

 

Sunrise Auranaut - Progressive rock project. Official site.

© Copyright: Âèòàëèé Êèñåëåâ, 2012-2017

Ïðèâåò!